Educating The Public Image

Educating The Public

We all need a healthy San Francisco Bay. Seven million Bay Area residents, 400 native species, our economy, and quality of life depend on it. Join Save The Bay along the shoreline to learn more about the importance of wetlands and our role in protecting them for future generations.

Educating The Public Hero Image

Educating The Public

We all need a healthy San Francisco Bay. Seven million Bay Area residents, 400 native species, our economy, and quality of life depend on it. Join Save The Bay along the shoreline to learn more about the importance of wetlands and our role in protecting them for future generations.

Get Involved In Restoration

Save The Bay specializes in restoring tidal marsh transition ecotone—the zone of habitat located between water and upland that provides improved water quality, critical plant and wildlife habitat, natural flood control, and a buffer against rising sea levels. More than 6,000 trained Save The Bay volunteers work annually to restore habitat at the edge of several tidal marsh sites around San Francisco Bay through our public, student, and corporate programs.

Public Programs

You can protect and restore the Bay! Individuals, families, and community groups are encouraged to join our public restoration programs. Most public programs occur on Saturday mornings, but there are occasional weekday public programs to assist within our Native Plant Nurseries.

Student Programs

Our service learning programs, aligned with California’s Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards, help students gain an understanding of Bay ecology and local wetlands, drawing on the connections between human actions and the impact on the environment.

Corporate Sponsorship/Programs

Corporate partners play an important role in the protection, restoration, and celebration of San Francisco Bay. Save The Bay’s award-winning restoration program allows your employees to give back to their community while protecting the natural treasure that defines our region.


The Ever-Evolving San Francisco Bay

The Bay was once fringed by 200,000 acres of tidal marsh, but more than 90 percent of this critical habitat was destroyed for agriculture, salt production, and urban development. We need these wetlands for a healthy, resilient Bay, especially in the face of climate change. Restoring tidal marshes helps our region prepare for the sea level rise we anticipate by 2050, while also providing numerous benefits to people and wildlife alike.

Map Gif

Credit: San Francisco Estuary Institute

Baylands


Bay / Channel
Tidal Flat
Tidal Marsh
Managed Pond
Salt Pond
Diked Wetland
Agriculture and Other Underdeveloped Areas
Developed Areas

Download Maps


1800 | 1998 | 2009 | future


Educational Resources

Save The Bay’s Watershed Curriculum

Save The Bay’s Watershed Curriculum provides support for Bay Area educators to incorporate experiential, Bay-specific activities into their lessons. The curriculum contains 29 standard aligned activities that help students develop an appreciation and understanding of the San Francisco Bay watershed. Activities focus on ecology, evolution, geology, history of human impact, and action projects. Download a complete copy of the Watershed Curriculum or the Watershed Student Journal.

Additional Educational Resources

Whether or not you’re able to bring your students to the Bay, there are myriad study aids available to help them learn about the plants, wildlife, history, ecology, and threats facing this important natural resource. Here are a few of our recommendations: