Restored Wetlands Hero Image

Restored Wetlands

Save The Bay has focused on transition zone habitat restoration in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2000, and we depend on over 5,000 adult and student volunteers each year to accomplish restoration focused specifically on transition zone habitats.

Restored Wetlands Hero Image

Restored Wetlands

Save The Bay has focused on transition zone habitat restoration in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2000, and we depend on over 5,000 adult and student volunteers each year to accomplish restoration focused specifically on transition zone habitats.

Progress In Restoring Wetlands and Wildlife Habitats

Save The Bay has worked with partners at numerous sites, including the Marin Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Santa Venetia Marsh in San Rafael, Schoolhouse Creek at Eastshore Park in Berkeley, Tolay Creek in Sonoma County, and Hal Brown Park at Creekside Marsh in Marin.

We engage in community-based restoration that focuses on restoring transition zone habitat adjacent to salt marshes in the area above the mean high tide line. These areas are typically degraded from human activities or adjacent to newly restored marshes where rapidly re-establishing native salt marsh vegetation is needed to jumpstart habitat. While habitat below the mean high tide often re-establishes naturally under the right conditions, the adjacent transition zones often do not readily re-establish without assistance.

Our sites are easy for the public to access, which allows for ease of participation in our restoration programs. The location of our sites are adjacent to areas heavily used by the public (i.e., bike and hiking trails, and urban development.), and they provide an additional opportunity to educate community members on the value of wetlands and their restoration.

Click on the map below to discover both recently completed and ongoing restoration projects.

Projects Map The Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project Ravenswood Pond SF2 Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Martin Luther King, Jr. Shoreline Palo Alto Baylands Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Ravenswood Pond R4 Bel Marin Keys Projects Map The Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project Ravenswood Pond SF2 Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Martin Luther King, Jr. Shoreline Palo Alto Baylands Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Ravenswood Pond R4 Bel Marin Keys Projects Map The Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project Ravenswood Pond SF2 Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Martin Luther King, Jr. Shoreline Palo Alto Baylands Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Ravenswood Pond R4 Bel Marin Keys Projects Map The Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project Ravenswood Pond SF2 Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Martin Luther King, Jr. Shoreline Palo Alto Baylands Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Ravenswood Pond R4 Bel Marin Keys Projects Map The Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project Ravenswood Pond SF2 Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Martin Luther King, Jr. Shoreline Palo Alto Baylands Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Ravenswood Pond R4 Bel Marin Keys Projects Map The Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project Ravenswood Pond SF2 Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Martin Luther King, Jr. Shoreline Palo Alto Baylands Eden Landing Ecological Reserve Ravenswood Pond R4 Bel Marin Keys

The Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project

The Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project

Save The Bay is proud to be a partner on the Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project. This unique experimental project is located on the property of the Oro Loma Sanitary District treatment plant, which is jointly owned by the Oro Loma and Castro Valley Sanitary Districts on the Hayward Shoreline. Starting in the fall/winter of 2014, Save The Bay constructed an on-site nursery facility at the wastewater treatment plant to support our work in growing plants for the Oro Loma Horizontal Levee Project. We propagated and installed more than 70,00 plants over a 15-month period on 1.4 acres of a constructed transition zone slope. We also hand spread over 3,000,000 native seeds on the site to compete with weeds and keep them from establishing. The success of these propagation and installation methods was astounding. Our work on this project is seen as a successful model of how to scale up nursery operations for large transition zone projects. We periodically continue to work at this site for minimum ongoing maintenance and to work with project partners on possible future iterations of this work for other projects. Read our full case study here.

Ravenswood Pond SF2

Ravenswood Pond SF2

Save The Bay worked to create a perimeter of native transition zone vegetation at the upper edge of the marsh along the eastern border of South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project Pond SF2 in Ravenswood to provide refugial habitat for important wildlife. Ravenswood Pond SF2 is located in Menlo Park within the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (USFWS) and is part the Ravenswood Complex of the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP). Pond SF2 is a reconfigured managed pond designed to provide nesting islands and habitat for shorebirds and pond-dependent bird species. Using volunteers and staff through our community-based restoration programs, Save The Bay assisted the USFWS and the SBSPR Project by planting the eastern border and banks of the pond with site-specific tidal marsh and upland grassland native plants. We educated the public and student groups about both the human and wildlife benefits of large-scale restoration while engaging volunteers in activities such as trash removal, non-native plant removal, and native plant revegetation.

Eden Landing Ecological Reserve

Eden Landing Ecological Reserve

We currently work at numerous sites at the Eden Landing Ecological Reserve (ELER).  However, we have worked to restore many sites at the ELER for over 15 years. We recently completed work at a site adjacent to the entryway at Eden Landing. This site was little more than an acre in size, but was significant to our work as we piloted the increased use of clonal (rhizomatous) species during restoration. While we planted over 10,000 plants at this site, we also decreased the number of species to include those that best represent typical habitat found historically at the Bay margins. The result is a beautiful mosaic of wetland grasses interspersed with taller, shrubby species that provide excellent habitat for endangered species and other small mammals and birds. Additionally, we recently completed restoration on a berm between the E9 and E14 ponds using a similar methodology. An interesting fact about that project is that our work was restricted during six months of the year when threatened Snowy Plovers nested on adjacent habitat. Seasonal trail openings at the ELER offer the public a glimpse of this work.  We completed these projects in partnership with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the California State Coastal Conservancy, and the East Bay Regional Park District, along with several other funders and partners.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Shoreline

Martin Luther King, Jr. Shoreline

We partner with the East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) to restore habitat along the Martin Luther King (MLK), Jr. Shoreline. If you have walked along the Shoreline at Damon Marsh Slough, East Creek Slough, or Garretson Point you will see some of the great work that Save The Bay staff and volunteers have accomplished in collaboration with the EBRPD and other partners such as BART and the Piedmont/Orinda Garden Clubs. This shoreline is important for its accessibility to East Bay communities and schools. For almost 20 years, we have brought local schools and public volunteers out to restore native habitat by removing non-native plants and planting local, native species such as gumplant, Western goldenrod, marsh baccharis, and other plants important for wildlife. The MLK, Jr. Shoreline provides access for many of our East Bay student education programs.  One of our native plant nursery facilities is also located along the MLK, Jr. Shoreline at Garretson Point and helps supply the plants needed for our restoration sites.

Palo Alto Baylands

Palo Alto Baylands

Save The Bay has worked at various sites in the Palo Alto Baylands for almost 20 years. We currently work in partnership with the City of Palo Alto and the Palo Alto Baylands at sites along Adobe Creek Trail, Byxbee Park, at the lagoon near the Lucy Evans Nature Center, and in partnership with the Woodside Atherton Garden Club at a site in front of our Palo Alto Nursery Facility. Our work in the Palo Alto Baylands comprises non-native species removal, trash removal, and native plant revegetation and restoration.  Our Palo Alto sites are conveniently located to many of our educational partners in the West and South Bay and is one of the major sites that supports our annual goal of serving 2,000 students each year.

Eden Landing Ecological Reserve

Eden Landing Ecological Reserve

The Eden Landing Ecological Reserve (ELER) is a beautiful area of restored salt ponds at the edge of the shoreline. We restore transition zone habitat at numerous sites within ELER in partnership with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the California State Coastal Conservancy, the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project, and the East Bay Regional Park District. Our volunteers love working here because it feels remote and away from the hustle and bustle of urban living. If you visit the site or volunteer with us on an early morning restoration program, you will certainly be treated to wonderful views of newly restored marsh and splendid birdwatching.

Ravenswood Pond R4

Ravenswood Pond R4

We are in the initial phase of this project as we are just starting to grow plants for restoration of two large transition zone sites at Ravenswood Pond R4 in partnership with the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service), the California State Coastal Conservancy, and the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project. Between these two transition zone sites at Pond R4, we will restore approximately 24.6 acres of transition zone habitat. We are piloting methods to scale our plant propagation and installation practices to accommodate the needs of this large site. This is an easily accessible site to enjoy nature at the edge of the Bay and to volunteer with other community members.

Bel Marin Keys

Bel Marin Keys

In the winter of 2017, Save The Bay began farming operations at a three-acre nursery site at the Bel Marin Keys Wetland Restoration Project. Save The Bay is partnering with the California Coastal Conservancy and Plant Minded Landscapes at the Hamilton Nursery facility to scale up our plant propagation operations and grow plants over the next two years for approximately 40 acres of seasonal wetlands. PlantMinded Landscapes is working with us to develop a small-scale farming operation to supply plants for the Bel Marin Keys project. This type of plant propagation work is the first of its kind for Save The Bay and lessons learned while executing this project will apply to similar large scale projects throughout San Francisco Bay.