Screen Shot 2016-07-29 at 2.48.06 PMAs an important member of our Save The Bay family, you know that we won’t rest on past successes. 

We fought hard and won on Measure AA—but with the November election comes a new ballot fight: Banning single-use plastic bags in California by passing Prop. 67. If we’re going to win this and other important fights for our Bay, we need your help. 

Disposable plastic bags kill fish and wildlife. Plastic pollution entangles, suffocates, and poisons hundreds of animal species worldwide, including sea turtles, birds, and marine mammals. Flimsy plastic bags break down into tiny pieces that are eaten by fish and contaminate the food chain. 

The most frustrating part is that California already passed a statewide plastic bag ban two years ago. But the out-of-state companies who make this trash forced a referendum onto the ballot in November. They would sacrifice our waters and wildlife to protect their profits. But we can stop them by “banning the bag” once and for all in California. 

Your membership contribution to Save The Bay today will also support our work to restore Bay Area wetlands, create Bay Smart communities, teach students about Bay habitat and mobilize volunteers on our shorelines. 

All of the work we’re doing at Save The Bay is intertwined, bound by the common goal of a clean, healthy, and resilient San Francisco Bay. And banning single-use bags is a simple solution that’s proven to protect our water and wildlife—we can’t let out-of-state companies stand in our way. That’s why we’re working hard to help pass Prop. 67 in November. 

When you join Save The Bay today, we will fight to pass Prop. 67 to help rid our Bay of toxic trash, restore critical wetlands around the Bay Area, and lead the way into the future with the development of Bay Smart communities. 

So please don’t hesitate—with so much at stake for our beloved San Francisco Bay, we need you standing with us now. 

Allison Chan

Allison manages Save The Bay’s pollution prevention program, which is focused on helping cities to implement policies that address the Bay's most common trash problems, such as cigarette butts, plastic bags, and Styrofoam take-out containers. When she’s not attending city council meetings or researching pollution, Allison loves to try new restaurants, hike, and seek sunny spots in San Francisco.