Save The Bay is one of ten community-based conservation organizations that make up the Restore America’s Estuaries (RAE), a national alliance dedicated to the protection and restoration of bays and estuaries that stretches from Rhode Island to Washington State. Every two years, RAE hosts an annual Summit to share knowledge around cutting-edge issues in coastal restoration and management. This year’s Summit, Investing in Our Coasts: Environment, Economy, and Culture, focused on the variety of benefits that coastal areas provide to communities and the nation, including ecological services, cultural services, and financial value. We always leave with a wealth of knowledge …


“Is this legit? Really? Is this all… kosher?” Like any gifted scientist, Jeff Sandler views great results with even greater skepticism. He’d won our Alaska Airlines prize after making his first-ever $250 donation to Save The Bay? A local teacher who regularly brings students to our SEED programs? Jeff worried it was all a fix – too good a story to be true. Two round-trip airline tickets to anywhere they fly with no restrictions – a dream prize! My team stressed: he’d won it fair and square. A computer pulled Jeff’s name at random, but we at Save The Bay …


I have loved salt marshes ever since I first stepped into one during a college wetlands class in Washington. I breathed in earthy scents. I felt mud squish beneath my boots. I watched birds fly low over the water. Now, the Bay wetlands nourish my spirit, and I am truly grateful they are the place I call home. As the Habitat Restoration Director at Save The Bay, I am proud that my work leading volunteer and education programs can directly benefit nearby wildlife. Our efforts provide critical habitat for endangered species like the salt marsh harvest mouse. But we never lose …


I moved to the Bay Area almost ten years ago. I was drawn to the region’s stunning beauty, diverse communities, and delicious food. Each year brings special life experiences for my family; we have countless memories of being together by the Bay. The Bay is the heart of my home. It’s why I’ve chosen to set up roots and raise my daughter here. But the Bay doesn’t just connect my family; it connects us all. The Bay defines our geography, bridging the gap between quiet neighborhoods and bustling downtowns. When the pace of city life becomes too frenetic, the Bay …


I​ ​am​ excited​ ​to​ ​introduce​ ​myself​ ​as​ ​the​ ​new​ ​Restoration​ ​Education​ ​Specialist​ ​for Save​ ​The​ ​Bay.​ ​I​ ​am​ ​very​ ​grateful​ ​to​ ​be​ ​a​ ​part​ ​of​ ​a​ ​passionate​ ​and​ ​talented​ ​team​ ​dedicated​ ​to the​ ​protection​ ​and​ ​restoration​ ​of​ ​the​ ​tidal​ ​marsh​ ​wetlands​ ​of​ ​the​ ​San​ ​Francisco​ ​Bay. Studying Environmental​ ​Studies​ ​and​ ​Sociology​ was certainly part of the reason I became an environmental​ ​educator​ ​and environmental​ ​justice​ ​activist. My main source of inspiration? Reading​ ​​Last Child​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Woods​ ​by​ ​Richard​ ​Louv​​ ​​. In​ ​his​ ​thought​-provoking​ ​book,​ ​Louv​ ​connects​ ​the​ ​rising​ trends​ ​of childhood ​obesity,​ ​depression​ ​and​ ​attention​ ​disorders​ ​to​ ​a​ ​decrease​ …


“Now we’re walking out… across the marsh!” This is not something you hear most teens shout on a typical weekday, but a group of take-charge girls from Belmont’s Notre Dame High School got the chance during one of Save The Bay’s DIRT programs. And they did more than announce their next steps: they filmed them! A student named Gina from Notre Dame’s AP Biology class captured the whole trip on camera as part of a web series called: “Teens Do Science.” Gina caught the action as her classmates took measurements on soil characteristics and assessed plant biodiversity. She was eager …


The 2017 State of the San Francisco Estuary Conference, held recently in Oakland, gave scientists, land managers, policy makers, community leaders, as well as writers and artists from across the Bay-Delta region an opportunity to connect with one another, and to build connections between their various fields. Throughout the conference, attendees were welcomed to “get out of their silos,” and explore the interrelatedness of their fields. The conference also provided a venue to look back at the past 20 years of tidal marsh restoration; to celebrate successes, evaluate where we fell short, and anticipate future challenges and opportunities for restoring …


San Francisco Bay is home to more than 7 million people and is the largest, most valuable estuary on the West Coast. Facebook’s headquarters is located right on the Bay’s beautiful shoreline, and the company has shown its commitment to protecting local habitat and ecosystems —from the innovative 9-acre green roof at its Menlo Park campus to its broader efforts in the Bay Area. By sponsoring Bay Day 2017, Facebook is helping people all around the Bay celebrate its iconic role in our community, and inspiring us all to better protect this shared natural wonder. Bay Day is San Francisco Bay’s …


Distressing images of birds trapped in plastic debris and trash fouling beaches have sadly become common news stories. Events like International Coastal Clean Up Day (Saturday, September 16) and National Estuaries Week (September 16-23), bring much-needed attention to the cleanliness of our Bay, coastline, and waterways. But, often overlooked and not often discussed, is where the vast majority of this trash begins its journey to the Bay. When we look for answers we need to look further inland to one of the greatest sources of Bay trash… our city streets. Trash is a daily and persistent threat to the health …


From our friends at San Francisco Bay Joint Venture, these videos show how wetland restoration is working throughout the Bay Area.  Check out the videos and take action to support wetland restoration projects near you. Wetland Restoration is Working, Video Short # 1 – Heron’s Head Park Wetland Restoration is Working, Video Short # 2 – San Pablo Bay