By Juliana Medan Bees are incredibly important for the wellbeing and survival of countless species, including our own. European honey bees are essential for agriculture. Native bees, of which there are over a thousand species, are very important for California native plants and ecosystems.  Bees play such a vital role in our environment, yet their wellbeing is threatened. Bees are responsible for pollination– making food available for other organisms, allowing for floral growth, and providing habitats for insects and birds. For the past ten years, beekeepers have reported annual hive losses of more than 30 percent. Bee populations have been dwindling …


We are thrilled to announce that we have a new website that showcases our work to protect and restore San Francisco Bay for people and wildlife. What’s changed? A lot. We have re-built from the ground up with bold colors, new content, a mobile-friendly platform, and fun illustrations like this little fella here (we call him Melvin). You can explore the new site in a fun and interactive way by joining us for a week-long Scavenger Hunt Contest starting February 4 through February 8. We will have daily clues and winners so stay tuned. Here’s how it works: Each day …


The San Francisco Chronicle originally published this article on February 15, 2018 Litter on California’s freeways and state roads is a disgrace, and it’s also one of the biggest reasons San Francisco Bay is choked with trash. Every time it rains, trash from freeways and busy state roads, like El Camino Real and San Pablo Avenue, pours through storm drains into creeks and, ultimately, San Francisco Bay. Bottles, wrappers, Styrofoam, straws and cigarettes poison fish and wildlife, smother wetland habitat and deface the shoreline. It’s time for our state transportation agency, Caltrans, to obey the law and stop polluting our waters. …


Josh Lankford knows numbers. A mechanical engineering student at the University of Rochester, this Oakland native estimates he travels by bike about 90% of the time when he visits the Bay Area. But digits can’t describe what he senses each ride. “On a bike, I don’t block out the world listening to music. So, I really feel like part of the ecosystem, going through neighborhoods — seeing how people interact, taking in smells, breathing in air, I experience all of that, everything around me.” Josh grew up in East Oakland, and as a kid, he “never really had the opportunity …


Foggy days never dampen the mood for Wai Leng Baker. “I read, I have a cup of tea and a couple cookies, and… it’s great!” Occasionally, Wai Leng introduces a bit of sound into her peaceful pastime: “Sometimes, I play music too in the background – Mozart or Vivaldi – nothing too terribly intrusive.” Our recent Alaska Airlines ticket winner has lived in the Bay Area for more than 40 years, and even in its coldest weather, she finds contentment. “Even if I don’t want to go out, I look at the trees and I feel it’s beautiful. It’s uplifting, …


When your work is restoring wetlands, a desktop computer and a trusty stack of post-its just won’t do. Our Restoration staffers install plants. They pull weeds. They teach thousands of students about the salt marsh harvest mouse and its favorite snack: pickleweed. What’s required for every one of these tasks? Tools. And…. “Everything that we need is in the truck.” Donna Ball, our Habitat Restoration Director, really enjoys talking about her team’s “roving office.” Plastic bins? “We have one for gloves, one for picks, one for trowels.” An Igloo cooler? “Our volunteers work really hard. There’s a chance to get …


I know I am not alone in feeling a deep bond to the diverse landscapes of the Bay Area. I was fortunate enough to spend my childhood living in the Bay Area and exploring everywhere from the redwoods and grasslands to the marshes and sand dunes. Those moments have driven me to give back to the land that has given so much to me. I am overjoyed to be joining Save the Bay as its Nursery Specialist. I was introduced to Save the Bay this past summer, when I participated in the fellowship program as the Nursery and Habitat Restoration …


“There’s an old adage that, around election time, voters behave stupidly. That’s wrong. Voters are treated like they’re stupid. It’s not the same thing.” Mitchell Oster doesn’t mince words. In fact, as Save The Bay’s new Regional Political Organizer, he finds there’s much to be gained by avoiding them altogether. “The most important thing you can give of yourself [as an organizer] is the openness to listen to the other person. An exchange of ideas is how you unlock an unexpected opportunity.” Interestingly, Mitchell made this connection in public schools – not political circles. Save The Bay’s newest Policy staffer …


“Is this legit? Really? Is this all… kosher?” Like any gifted scientist, Jeff Sandler views great results with even greater skepticism. He’d won our Alaska Airlines prize after making his first-ever $250 donation to Save The Bay? A local teacher who regularly brings students to our SEED programs? Jeff worried it was all a fix – too good a story to be true. Two round-trip airline tickets to anywhere they fly with no restrictions – a dream prize! My team stressed: he’d won it fair and square. A computer pulled Jeff’s name at random, but we at Save The Bay …


From the ancient Egyptians to the Ohlone living here in the Bay Area, many cultures experience winter as a powerful time of ritual, reflection, and renewal. The season officially begins Thursday, December 21st – with a solstice! The term translates to “sun stands still,” as the sun appears to pause in its incremental journey across the sky. Save The Bay decided to mark this changing of the seasons by planting seedlings with some of our most dedicated volunteers and donors. Through their labor and their generosity, this diverse community had already given richly to support our programs. But on last …