This dynamic duo joined Save The Bay in 2008 ready to dig in and help our team restore San Francisco Bay. From early morning commutes and all staff planting days, to nursery programs and trash cleanups, Fuego and Red are at the heart of the Save The Bay Family.

Meet Fuego

Fuego is known as the truck with the big personality. She enjoys throwback hits from the 90’s and playing jokes on Save The Bay’s Habitat Restoration Team! Her favorite prank is taking control of the radio’s volume. If the team wants to listen to music, she will crank up the tunes to start her own little party. Fuego also likes to keep the team on their toes when it comes to her AC, which only works on low or hurricane strength.It is never a dull moment when you get to work with Fuego! Besides her silly side, Fuego has a passion for educating the public and inspiring the next generation of Bay Savers. Her favorite work days are spent helping the restoration team run public volunteer programs. Fuego loves to meet new people and teach them about how they can give back to the Bay she loves.

Meet Red

The other half of our duo is Red. She loves power lifting, off roading, and likes to live life on the edge (of the Bay). Red doesn’t mind getting down and dirty for a good cause like restoring tidal marshes. Unlike her playful counterpart, Red prefers a peaceful morning commute with the team listening to NPR. But don’t be fooled, she loves to give the team a good surprise by unexpectedly popping her hood sometimes! Red takes her work with Save The Bay very seriously. She likes to spend her days in the nurseries doing the heavy lifting of water, plants, and tools that the team needs to build up wetlands.

Over the last ten years these two workhorses have helped our team transplant over 400,000 plants and have driven roughly 240,000 miles across the region! But this hard work has taken a toll on our beloved family members. We need your help because the wheel bearings wear out on the trucks due to our proximity to the salty bay, the heavy loads we haul, and the pothole ridden freeway 880.

Join us this Giving Tuesday, November 27, as we work to raise $15,000 or more toward a new Restoration Truck!


Measure W helps reduce Bay Area traffic

Those who commute in San Mateo County know how bad the traffic is. If you’ve driven through the 101-92 interchange recently, you know something needs to be done to relieve congestion and improve commute time. To achieve this, we must not only fund highway projects, but also enhance public transit options, support alternative modes of transportation, and connect high-quality transit to affordable housing.

Measure W will do just that by raising $2.4 billion over 30 years for projects that will take thousands of cars off of highways every day, fix potholes and maintain streets throughout the County, and make it safer to travel to schools and employment centers by bike and on foot.


Photo courtesy of No on Prop 6

Improvements and upgrades to Bay Area roads and public transit are decades overdue. Not only does this outdated, inefficient, and crumbling infrastructure impact our daily lives—especially for those traveling from the outskirts of our region—it threatens the health of the Bay.

We need to invest in our transportation infrastructure to protect the Bay and improve quality of life in our region. But Proposition 6 will do the opposite by eliminating more than $700 million in statewide investments in public transit, road and bridge repairs, and initiatives to increase bicycle and pedestrian mobility.


Photo credit: Yes on Measure V

As San Jose grows and becomes more expensive, too many hardworking families are being forced out of the city they love. San Jose needs housing to reduce the hours and hours of time workers spend commuting. Affordable housing can reduce commute times and help decrease emissions that lead to pollution and contribute to climate change.

Measure V authorizes $450 million of general obligation bonds to acquire, construct and complete affordable housing in San Jose. Alleviating the critical shortage of affordable housing is essential to creating Bay Smart Communities that improve Bay Area sustainability. Measure V will produce and preserve housing with access to transit so more low-income and middle-income residents aren’t displaced, and can live close to work without long drives that emit pollution and greenhouse gasses that worsen climate change.


Streets in downtown San Jose

Decades of neglect and lack of investment in San Jose’s urban infrastructure have left neighborhoods highly vulnerable to natural disasters and drought, leaving disadvantaged communities shouldering too much of that vulnerability. The February 2017 Coyote Creek flood forced 14,000 people to evacuate and caused $100 million in property damage. San Jose also struggles to comply with regulations to reduce trash and other pollutants from the city’s stormwater that flows into San Francisco Bay.

Measure T authorizes $650 million of general obligation bonds to protect vital infrastructure and people from earthquakes, floods and other disasters, and preserves natural open space. Bond funds will repair deteriorating streets, bridges and stormwater systems, and upgrade emergency preparedness.


Photo credit: Bill Clark

The East Bay Regional Park District provides Bay Area residents with access to public parks and trails along the San Francisco Bay Shoreline, an oasis destination that goes beyond the bustling urban development.

Measure FF funds protection and enhancement of urban parks by extending the current annual parcel tax on property owners in parts of western Alameda and Contra Costa Counties. It extends the tax of $12/year per single-family parcel and $8.28/year for multi-family units, raising approximately $3.3 million annually for the parks.


Photo courtesy of Strengthen Our Seawall for Earthquakes and Disasters, Yes on Prop. A

Proposition A authorizes $425 million in general obligation bonds to repair the 100-year old seawall along San Francisco’s waterfront, whose failure in a major earthquake could flood $100 billion in property and crucial infrastructure.

The Embarcadero already experiences flooding several times each year during King Tides. Floods will occur more often from severe storms, and up to five feet of additional sea level rise is expected this century. Even without a major earthquake, this flooding threatens vital roads along the waterfront, in the financial district, and nearby residential neighborhoods.

Flooding also could inundate BART and Muni tunnels, utility and water systems and historic buildings, such as the Ferry Building and along Fisherman’s Wharf. The Bay is too deep along the San Francisco waterfront to construct marshes for shoreline protection – this is one area where strengthening and raising the seawall is essential.


Vote for the Bay this November

YOU can keep fish, birds, and Bay Area communities safe as sea levels rise. YOU can make sure our tap water is truly safe to drink. YOU can slash greenhouse gas emissions and improve public transit across the region. All you have to do is VOTE!

But with so much on the November ballot, where should you begin? Right here! Below you’ll find all the information you need to shape San Francisco Bay’s future – right from the ballot box.


Facebook employees volunteer on the shoreline

Every year, Facebook gives hundreds of their interns the chance to leave their laptops behind and make a difference outdoors, along the Bay.

“People need that connection with the Earth,” says Lauren Swezey. “When I’ve been inside all day, and then I take a step outdoors and inhale, exhale… I can feel my mood changing.”

As Sustainability and Community Outreach Manager, Lauren forms partnerships with environmental organizations like Save The Bay. “It’s important for us to pass a healthy Bay on to our kids and grandkids. The next generations are what drive me to improve our environment, to get others passionate about renewable energy, sustainable homes, and the natural world.”